Giuseppe Sammartini

Top Songs & Albums Giuseppe Sammartini

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... read moreGiuseppe Sammartini was an oboist who studied with his father. By the age of thirteen he was already performing with his father in an orchestra of Novara in 1711. By 1720 he was with the Teatro Regio Ducal in Milan and his first concerto was published in Amsterdam as early as 1717 (but possibly...

Key songs

Giuseppe Sammartini
Concerto Op. 9 Nº 1 For Harpsichord, Strings And Continuo In A Major: Allegro Assai
3:47
Giuseppe Sammartini
Concerto Op. 9 Nº 1 For Harpsichord, Strings And Continuo In A Major: Andante Spirituoso, Allegro Assai
6:49
Giuseppe Sammartini
Concerto Op. 9 Nº 1 For Harpsichord, Strings And Continuo In A Major: Andante
4:35
Giuseppe Sammartini
Sonata No. 3 En Sol Mayor, Op. 2: I. Andante
3:57
Giuseppe Sammartini
Sonata No. 3 En Sol Mayor, Op. 2: Ii. Allegro
3:12

Biography

Country Of origin: Italy

Giuseppe Sammartini was an oboist who studied with his father. By the age of thirteen he was already performing with his father in an orchestra of Novara in 1711. By 1720 he was with the Teatro Regio Ducal in Milan and his first concerto was published in Amsterdam as early as 1717 (but possibly later). Sammartini was an highly lauded oboe player noted for his oboe techniques and abilities. In England he first performed at the Haymarket Theater in London and later performed for the opera orchestra of the King's Theater. From 1736 he served in the household of Frederick, Prince of Wales and his wife Augusta giving lessons to her and the children. Sammartini remained in service there until his death. Compositions by Sammartini only received posthumous accolades for his musical compositions were not known during his lifetime. Writing a number of works including twenty four sonatas for flute and bass, thirty trios for recorders or violins, twenty four concerto grossi -- scored for strings with added oboe solos, four keyboard concertos, an oboe concerto, sixteen overtures, flute duets and a cello sonata, Sammartini employed variety in number, order and movement styles. In his modern compositions he used three movements. The concertos of Sammartini influenced the development of the trio form. In critical analysis he was skilled in harmony writing gentle but keen melodies. He had a preference for slow movements in which he demonstrated a breadth of harmonic ability. ~ Keith Johnson~ Rovi