(2019) King-Federal Rockabillys

Various Artists

... read moreIn the mid-1950s, perhaps spurred by the success of Elvis Presley and other country-oriented artists who were enjoying crossover success on the pop charts, Syd Nathan started issuing rockabilly recordings on his King and Federal labels. Although none of the artists compiled here ever achieved...

31′:31″ 14 Songs

1
Grandaddy's Rockin'
Various Artists
2:02
2
One Hand Loose
Various Artists
2:22
3
Bip A Little, Bop A Lot
Various Artists
1:58
4
Rockin' Up
Various Artists
1:50
5
Little Miss Linda
Various Artists
2:37
6
Bottle To The Baby
Various Artists
2:19
7
Goose Bumps
Various Artists
2:01
8
If I Had Me A Woman
Various Artists
2:20
9
Everybody's Lovin' My Baby
Various Artists
2:13
10
Jungle Rock
Various Artists
2:49
11
Peg Pants
Various Artists
2:06
12
Say So
Various Artists
2:28
13
Nobody's Woman
Various Artists
2:16
14
Eeny Meeny Miney Mo
Various Artists
2:10
Released 05 September 2019, 1978 Gusto Records, Inc.

Review

In the mid-1950s, perhaps spurred by the success of Elvis Presley and other country-oriented artists who were enjoying crossover success on the pop charts, Syd Nathan started issuing rockabilly recordings on his King and Federal labels. Although none of the artists compiled here ever achieved anything remotely resembling a hit for the label, these 14 tracks featuring the cream of the rockabilly sides from the King and Federal labels stand as a fine document to the burgeoning rockabilly sound. The big ticket here are four classic tracks from the legendary Charlie Feathers ("One Hand Loose," "Bottle to the Baby," "Everybody's Lovin' My Baby," and "Nobody's Woman") and five from King label mate Mac Curtis, "Granddaddy's Rockin'," "Say So," "If I Had A Woman," "Little Miss Linda" and the previously unissued "Goosebumps." Although seldom remembered today, the Texas-born Curtis was the more successful of the two artists, recording sixteen sides for the label. Far and away, the strangest track aboard this collection is "Jungle Rock" by Hank Mizell. Strange simply because the record was a flop back in the '50s, only to become a freak hit in England in 1976, some 20 years after its release, bringing Mizell out of retirement to a hero's welcome abroad. Hillbilly boogie fans will love "Peg Pants" by Bill Beach and Joe Penny's "Bip a Little, Bop a Lot," both solid numbers with great soloing, especially the steel breaks on Beach's effort. Canada's answer to the Collins Kids, Bob and Lucille, come up with a great novelty rocker with "Eenie Meeny Miney Mo," complete with all the hiccuping and glottal shrieks that are emblematic of great classic rockabilly vocalizing. A borderline rocker (more rock & roll than real rockabilly if you're splitting hairs about such things) comes in the form of "Rockin' Up" by Ronnie Molleen. A wild rocker with a Little Richard-style vocal, this one definitely stands out against the guitar-driven tracks here, but is a fine addition regardless. ~ Cub Koda