(2019) 4Real 4Real

Yg

... read moreYG intended to release his fifth Def Jam album in April 2019, but after the murder of Nipsey Hussle, he pushed it back, and appended the tribute he delivered at the memorial for his "brother from the other color." Its cover inscribed with "In loving memory of Nipsey Hussle," 4REAL 4REAL would be the...

Explicit

46′:57″ 14 Songs

1
Hard Bottoms & White Socks
Yg
3:47
2
Bottle Service
Yg
2:52
3
In The Dark
Yg
3:10
4
Go Loko
Yg
4:59
5
Stop Snitchin
Yg
2:29
6
I Was On The Block
Yg
4:00
7
Keshia Had A Baby
Yg
3:57
8
Heart 2 Heart
Yg
3:51
9
Play Too Much
Yg
3:24
10
Do Not Disturb
Yg
3:05
11
Do Yo Dance
Yg
4:30
12
Her Story
Yg
1:57
13
My Last Words (Nipsey Tribute)
Yg
2:40
14
Stop Snitchin (Remix)
Yg
2:16
Released 24 May 2019, ℗ 2019 Def Jam Recordings, a division of UMG Recordings, Inc.

Review

YG intended to release his fifth Def Jam album in April 2019, but after the murder of Nipsey Hussle, he pushed it back, and appended the tribute he delivered at the memorial for his "brother from the other color." Its cover inscribed with "In loving memory of Nipsey Hussle," 4REAL 4REAL would be the most subdued YG album even without that stirring reflection. Allusions to physical aggression are reduced and usually dealt with some humor. In "Bottle Service," outfitted with a fearsome Mustard and CuBeatz production, YG casually dismisses a foe with "You can be the next 50 -- take these nine shots." Later, in "Go Loko," he'll "put you in a chokehold," but it's meant as an enticement as he addresses his "mamacita" while he sports a sombrero. Only "Stop Snitchin" threatens gunplay in purely venomous terms. Elsewhere, he's rhyming at a conversational volume about "that heartfelt shit," narrating the downcast "Keisha Had a Baby" (realistic if not tragic like 2Pac's "Brenda's Got a Baby"), and rapping the turnabout side-piece blues in "Play Too Much." There's some good, tipsy fun in "Do Yo Dance," low-slung West Coast-via-Midwest funk in the vein of Still Brazy highlight "Twist My Fingaz," but then YG shows a little maturity -- and signs of creeping teetotalism -- by speaking lowly of recreational drug use on other tracks. A more significant development is the increased quantity of roles for women. Authoritative rapper/singer Kamaiyah and hook specialist Rose Gold are on two tracks each, while Day Sulan temporarily takes over with "Her Story," a plaintive and riveting standout. ~ Andy Kellman