(2017) 1935-1951

Cleo Brown

... read moreWith the exception of an album that she made in 1987, 1935-1951 is all anyone has heard of the recordings of pianist-singer Cleo Brown. Brown, who has sometimes been cited by Dave Brubeck as an early influence (although the musical connection really cannot be heard), was an excellent pianist and a...

01:12′:30″ 27 Songs

1
Cleo Brown
Here Comes Cookie
2:53
2
Cleo Brown
You're A Heavenly Thing
2:53
3
Cleo Brown
I'll Take The South
2:37
4
Cleo Brown
The Stuff Is Here And It's Mellow
2:44
5
Cleo Brown
Boogie Woogie
2:28
6
Cleo Brown
'Way Back Home, Pt. 2
3:00
7
Cleo Brown
Pelican Stomp
2:22
8
Cleo Brown
Never Too Tired For Love
3:05
9
Cleo Brown
Give A Broken Heart A Break
2:38
10
Cleo Brown
Mama Don't Want No Peas An' Rice An' Cocoanut Oil
2:45
11
Cleo Brown
Me And My Wonderful One
2:46
12
Cleo Brown
When Hollywood Goes Black And Tan
2:46
13
Cleo Brown
When
3:05
14
Cleo Brown
You're My Fever
2:50
15
Cleo Brown
Breakin' In A Pair Of Shoes
2:45
16
Cleo Brown
Latch On
2:52
17
Cleo Brown
Slow Poke
2:41
18
Cleo Brown
Love In The First Degree
2:24
19
Cleo Brown
My Gal Mezzanine
2:29
20
Cleo Brown
Cleo's Boogie
2:44
21
Cleo Brown
I'd Climb The Highest Mountain
2:33
22
Cleo Brown
Cook That Stuff
2:21
23
Cleo Brown
Don't Overdo It
2:34
24
Cleo Brown
Two Little Twains
2:31
25
Cleo Brown
Coffee Colored Child
2:43
26
Cleo Brown
Rollit Boogie
2:47
27
Cleo Brown
Hole In The Wall
2:14
Released 18 October 2017, Resurfaced Records

Review

With the exception of an album that she made in 1987, 1935-1951 is all anyone has heard of the recordings of pianist-singer Cleo Brown. Brown, who has sometimes been cited by Dave Brubeck as an early influence (although the musical connection really cannot be heard), was an excellent pianist and a personable good-time singer. She recorded four sessions for Decca during 1935-36, in which she is backed by guitar, bass, and drums, performing such numbers as "Lookie, Lookie, Lookie, Here Comes Cookie," "The Stuff Is Here And It's Mellow," "Mama Don't Want No Peas An' Rice An' Cocoanut Oil" and the unusual "When Hollywood Goes Black And Tan." In addition, she romps on the solo "Pelican Stomp," her part from a Decca All Star Revue is included, and there is one session apiece from 1949, 1950, and 1951. It seems odd that she never became a big star. Needless to say, this CD is the perfect way to obtain and enjoy this lost legend's recordings. ~ Scott Yanow