(1969) Bossa Rio

Bossa Rio

... read moreHighly sought on vinyl by bossa nova fans, this debut album from this short-lived sextet (not to be confused with Sergio Mendes' Bossa Rio Sextet) seems to suggest a theory: the more handshakes away from Herb Alpert, the better and more authentic the music. Bossa Rio was discovered and produced by...

31′:27″ 11 Songs

1
Bossa Rio
Saiupa (Por Causs De Voce Menina)
2:09
2
Bossa Rio
Do You Know The Way To San Jose
2:44
3
Bossa Rio
Wave
3:08
4
Bossa Rio
Day By Day
2:36
5
Bossa Rio
Today, Tomorrow (Boa Palavra)
2:47
6
Bossa Rio
Up, Up And Away
3:09
7
Bossa Rio
Nana
2:04
8
Bossa Rio
Old Devil Moon
3:14
9
Bossa Rio
Veleiro
3:10
10
Bossa Rio
Gentle Rain
3:53
11
Bossa Rio
Cancao Do Sal (Sultry Song)
2:33
Released 05 May 1969, An A&M Records Release; ℗ 1969 UMG Recordings, Inc.

Review

Highly sought on vinyl by bossa nova fans, this debut album from this short-lived sextet (not to be confused with Sergio Mendes' Bossa Rio Sextet) seems to suggest a theory: the more handshakes away from Herb Alpert, the better and more authentic the music. Bossa Rio was discovered and produced by Mendes, who in turn was brought into the A&M fold by Alpert. Despite three Brasil '66-ish sounding covers of American hits ("Day by Day," "Up, Up, and Away," and "Do You Know the Way to San Jose"), Bossa Rio stick to tunes from Antonio Carlos Jobim, Jorge Ben, Caetano Veloso, and Milton Nascimento, keeping with their roots (as Mendes and Brasil '66 progressed, the American chart covers took over their albums). Lead vocalist Gracinha Laporace has a clear, gentle tone, perfect for their mellow versions of "Wave" and "Cancao do Sal (Sultry Song)." Organist Manfredo Fest puts the devil in the details, giving a giddy feel to "Nana" and "Today, Tomorrow," coaxing similar sounds out of his Hammond as, strangely enough, Soft Machine's Mike Ratledge. A wonderful album for fans of commercial bossa nova, now available on Japanese import CD only. ~ Ted Mills