(2009) Reggae Sunday Service, Vol. 2

Various Artists

... read moreTraditional reggae has historically either been about railing against the misuse of power in Babylon or having a good time in a Saturday night dancehall, or both at once, and when the focus is shifted to Sunday morning and Christianity, the result is what has been termed "reggae gospel," although...

49′:36″ 12 Songs

1
Various Artists
There's An End To It
4:03
2
Various Artists
One Day At A Time
4:09
3
Various Artists
Jesus You're The One
3:43
4
Various Artists
Praise The Lord
3:39
5
Various Artists
I Shall Not Die
5:16
6
Various Artists
Jesus Loves Me
3:46
7
Various Artists
Blessed Are The Peacemakers
4:16
8
Various Artists
I Shall Not Be Moved
4:10
9
Various Artists
No Sin At All
4:17
10
Various Artists
Blessings
4:37
11
Various Artists
One More Chance
3:57
12
Various Artists
The Lord Is My Shepherd
3:43
Released 28 August 2009, ℗ Jet Star Music Ltd

Review

Traditional reggae has historically either been about railing against the misuse of power in Babylon or having a good time in a Saturday night dancehall, or both at once, and when the focus is shifted to Sunday morning and Christianity, the result is what has been termed "reggae gospel," although all too often this hybrid is neither reggae nor gospel in the basic sense, being too diluted to pass as good reggae and hardly fiery enough to be called true gospel. This brief collection of reggae gospel more or less proves the point, with only the two selections by Oswald Collins, "There's an End to It" and "Blessed Are the Peacemakers," really showing much life. When Bob Marley sang about redemption, he more or less demanded it based on past cultural and racial injustices, and when redemption is sung about here, it has to be prayed for, and earned through personal atonement, and therein floats the difference. ~ Steve Leggett