(2005) Here Comes Cleo

Cleo Brown

... read moreCleo Brown impressed a lot of folks with her jazz piano and swinging vocals during the 1930s and 1940s before abruptly retiring from her recording career until Marian McPartland coaxed her into appearing on her NPR radio program, as well as making a final CD for Jazzology, both near the end of Brown...

01:11′:39″ 27 Songs

1
Cleo Brown
Here Comes Cookie
3:12
2
Cleo Brown
You're A Heavenly Thing
2:36
3
Cleo Brown
I'll Take The South
2:41
4
Cleo Brown
The Stuff Is Here And It's Mellow
2:41
5
Cleo Brown
Boogie Woogie
1:21
6
Cleo Brown
Pelican Stomp
2:16
7
Cleo Brown
Never Too Tired To Love
2:56
8
Cleo Brown
Give A Broken Heart A Break
2:32
9
Cleo Brown
Mama Don't Want No Peas An' Rice An' Coconut Oil
2:38
10
Cleo Brown
Me And My Wonderful One
2:41
11
Cleo Brown
When Hollywood Goes Black And Tan
2:45
12
Cleo Brown
When
3:04
13
Cleo Brown
You're My Fever
2:49
14
Cleo Brown
Breakin' In A Pair Of Shoes
2:44
15
Cleo Brown
Latch On
2:53
16
Cleo Brown
Slow Poke
2:38
17
Cleo Brown
Love In The First Degree
2:22
18
Cleo Brown
My Gal Mezzanine
2:27
19
Cleo Brown
You've Got Me Under Your Thumb
2:38
20
Cleo Brown
Swingin' On The Swanee Shore
2:09
21
Cleo Brown
Who's That Knockin' At My Heart?
2:11
22
Cleo Brown
Did You Mean It
3:28
23
Cleo Brown
Man, Be On Your Way
2:42
24
Cleo Brown
My Handy Andy
2:48
25
Cleo Brown
Who'll Chop Your Suey?
3:00
26
Cleo Brown
Tramp
2:51
27
Cleo Brown
Is Jenny Getting Any More?
2:36
Released 13 December 2005, ℗ HEP Records

Review

Cleo Brown impressed a lot of folks with her jazz piano and swinging vocals during the 1930s and 1940s before abruptly retiring from her recording career until Marian McPartland coaxed her into appearing on her NPR radio program, as well as making a final CD for Jazzology, both near the end of Brown's life. This Hep compilation includes 27 of Brown's recordings from the 1930s. While many of these songs have long since fallen into obscurity, Brown's approach to songs sometimes suggests Fats Waller, though she is a bit more subtle with her vocals than Waller. Her rapid-fire treatment of Pinetop Smith's "Boogie Woogie" is easily the most memorable track, though her stride piano chops in her own "Pelican Stomp" (an unaccompanied performance) are also quite impressive. The source material for this CD varies quite a bit in sound quality, but the digital remastering minimizes the distraction of the occasional noisy track. Recommended. ~ Ken Dryden