(2012) Night Dust

Evan Caminiti

... read moreEvan Caminiti's fourth solo album finds the Barn Owl stalwart continuing to do what he loves best -- exploring the dark, atmospheric possibilities of electric guitar -- but in a way that introduces a slightly different focus, unsurprising given his core band's constant restlessness in both releases...

39′:15″ 11 Songs

1
Evan Caminiti
Near Dark
4:00
2
Evan Caminiti
Returning Spirits
5:13
3
Evan Caminiti
A Memory Or A Mirage
3:26
4
Evan Caminiti
Star Circle
3:22
5
Evan Caminiti
The River
2:39
6
Evan Caminiti
Red Sun Blues
2:37
7
Evan Caminiti
Moon Is The Hunter
4:14
8
Evan Caminiti
Last Blue Moments
5:00
9
Evan Caminiti
Slow Fade Of Stars
3:22
10
Evan Caminiti
First Light I
3:16
11
Evan Caminiti
First Light Ii
2:06
Released 18 May 2012, Immune Recordings

Review

Evan Caminiti's fourth solo album finds the Barn Owl stalwart continuing to do what he loves best -- exploring the dark, atmospheric possibilities of electric guitar -- but in a way that introduces a slightly different focus, unsurprising given his core band's constant restlessness in both releases and performances. If anything, Night Dust suggests a strange, striking confluence of everything from This Mortal Coil's grinding industrial atmospherics and early Slowdive instrumentals to guitar/electronics combinations by everyone from Bill Laswell to Steve Roach -- always suggestive of parallel work but insistent on finding its own distinct sound and logic, an exploration more than a re-creation. Certainly, both Roach and, perhaps as a looming background figure, Brian Eno figure into such songs as "Returning Spirits" and "Last Blue Moments," but Caminiti takes the ideas of deep space and echoed tones as something to place guitar directly into, with drones aiming at a hushed, moodily peaceful place in the former song and acoustic guitar sliding into a void on the latter. The combination of acoustic/electric possibilities further calls to mind figures like Dave Pearce and especially Roy Montgomery, with the romantic swoop of "The River" being one of the better songs in the New Zealand guitarist's own achingly powerful vein in a long while. But while there's a constant set of contextual points to refer to, what increasingly becomes strongest and clearest about Night Dust is how Caminiti's own particular magpie aesthetic comes to the fore, from the chimes amid the drones of "A Memory or a Mirage" to the slow ebbing away of "Red Sun Blues," and how "First Light II" ends with distant fuzz and crumble and tape hiss along with beautiful guitar. ~ Ned Raggett