(1997) All Woman

Hurricane G

... read moreKnown for his association with Madonna and his work in dance music, Jellybean Benitez isn't someone you'd expect to serve as executive producer on a hardcore rap effort. But that's exactly what he does on All Woman, the debut album by Puerto Rican female rapper Hurricane G. This isn't a rap CD with...

Explicit

49′:13″ 15 Songs

1
Hurricane G
Intro
1:36
2
Hurricane G
All The Way Live
2:49
3
Hurricane G
Underground Lockdown
3:55
4
Hurricane G
Roc U
4:00
5
Hurricane G
Somebody Else
3:48
6
Hurricane G
El Barrio (Spanish)
4:18
7
Hurricane G
Mama
4:05
8
Hurricane G
Wuteva
3:29
9
Hurricane G
Boriqua Mami
3:26
10
Hurricane G
Coast To Coast
3:30
11
Hurricane G
D, Toya & Nini
0:38
12
Hurricane G
No Love
3:57
13
Hurricane G
Neva Give Up
4:27
14
Hurricane G
De Corazon
3:53
15
Hurricane G
Outro
1:22
Released 16 September 1997, ℗ H.O.L.A.

Review

Known for his association with Madonna and his work in dance music, Jellybean Benitez isn't someone you'd expect to serve as executive producer on a hardcore rap effort. But that's exactly what he does on All Woman, the debut album by Puerto Rican female rapper Hurricane G. This isn't a rap CD with lots of pop or dance-music influence, and in fact, underproduced jams like "Boriqua Mami," "Underground Locdown" and "El Barrio" are characterized by a definite lack of slickness. The Brooklyn native, who raps in both English and Spanish, goes for simplicity and favors a deadpan, very informal delivery comparable to EPMD. Unlike many New York rappers who were popular in 1997, she doesn't inundate listeners with technique. As much of an in-your-face, tough-girl attitude as she often projects, the hip-hopper shows a lot of vulnerability on "Mama," a touching and poigant ode to her mother. Hurricane does tend to spend too much time boasting (a problem with quite a few MCs), but even so, All Woman was one of the more enjoyable rap releases of late 1997. ~ Alex Henderson