(2011) Bushman Sings The Bush Doctor: A Tribute To Peter Tosh

Bushman

... read moreBushman’s admiration of Peter Tosh has been obvious ever since the release of his late-‘90s cut “Cannabis,” which slithered and smoked like an updated version of Tosh’s “Legalize It.” He’s also close to Tosh’s range and phrasing when it comes to vocal delivery, or in the case of this tribute album...

01:11′:18″ 15 Songs

1
Creation
Bushman
6:38
2
Bush Doctor
Bushman
4:06
3
Legalize It
Bushman
4:30
4
Buckinham Palace
Bushman
8:46
5
Stepping Razor
Bushman
3:58
6
Mawga Dog
Bushman
3:27
7
Brand New Second Hand Gal
Bushman
3:42
8
Don't Look Back (Feat. Tarrus Riley)
Bushman
3:59
9
Johnny B Goode
Bushman
4:16
10
Mama Africa (Feat. Buju Banton)
Bushman
4:21
11
Equal Rights
Bushman
4:31
12
Igziabeher
Bushman
4:34
13
Oh Bumbo Klatt
Bushman
4:52
14
Downpresser Man
Bushman
4:01
15
Mystic Man
Bushman
5:37
Released 21 January 2011, 2011 VP Music Group, Inc

Review

Bushman’s admiration of Peter Tosh has been obvious ever since the release of his late-‘90s cut “Cannabis,” which slithered and smoked like an updated version of Tosh’s “Legalize It.” He’s also close to Tosh’s range and phrasing when it comes to vocal delivery, or in the case of this tribute album, he’s perilously close. With the singer pouring heart and soul into these covers, Bushman Sings the Bush Doctor: A Tribute to Peter Tosh doesn’t necessarily feel cautious, but these recordings are so true to the originals in arrangement, instrumentation, and performance that it might be a case of respect getting in the way. Bushman’s take on “Legalize It” features the same combination of laid-back and militant that Tosh crafted on the original, while his version of “Stepping Razor” bounces from cool to kinetic in a way that’s familiar to any reggae fan. That familiarity might undermine the song’s sense of danger for some, and while it isn’t Bushman’s fault that most will come to this tribute with a full awareness of the material, his choice to play these covers straight is perplexing, especially with so much forward-thinking music in his back catalog. When it comes to both quality of performance and connection to the material, Bushman is well above admirable throughout the album, and with Tarrus Riley taking the place of Mick Jagger on “Don’t Look Back,” the cut is modern roots of the highest order. Fans who agree with Bushman’s choice to redo, rather than rework or remodel, these songs will have no complaints. Others may feel that this satisfying tribute is a missed opportunity and could have really been a stupendous one. ~ David Jeffries