(2000) Polarity

Jimmy Bruno & Joe Beck

... read moreThese two guitarists, seemingly dissimilar in style, are in lockstep throughout this recording. Bruno plays most of the lead lines, with Beck comping behind him on the alto guitar he invented. Long one of the best-kept secrets in jazz, Beck had a couple of minor hits (his album with David Sanborn on...

59′:12″ 13 Songs

1
Jimmy Bruno & Joe Beck
How Long Has This Been Going On
4:36
2
Jimmy Bruno & Joe Beck
Lazy Afternoon
4:33
3
Jimmy Bruno & Joe Beck
Polarity
4:10
4
Jimmy Bruno & Joe Beck
I've Grown Accustomed To Her Face
4:13
5
Jimmy Bruno & Joe Beck
Eleanor Rigby
5:14
6
Jimmy Bruno & Joe Beck
Estate (Album Version)
5:57
7
Jimmy Bruno & Joe Beck
Summertime
3:47
8
Jimmy Bruno & Joe Beck
Tenderly
4:19
9
Jimmy Bruno & Joe Beck
Carioca Blue
4:50
10
Jimmy Bruno & Joe Beck
Emily
4:05
11
Jimmy Bruno & Joe Beck
I Don't Stand A Gost Of A Chance With You
4:15
12
Jimmy Bruno & Joe Beck
Cherokee
4:14
13
Jimmy Bruno & Joe Beck
Poem For #15
4:59
Released 01 January 2000, ℗ 2000 Concord Records, Inc.

Review

These two guitarists, seemingly dissimilar in style, are in lockstep throughout this recording. Bruno plays most of the lead lines, with Beck comping behind him on the alto guitar he invented. Long one of the best-kept secrets in jazz, Beck had a couple of minor hits (his album with David Sanborn on CTI in the '70s comes to mind), as well as performing and recordings with the likes of Gil Evans, Duke Ellington, Paul Simon, Buddy Rich, and Frank Sinatra, among many others. In fact, it was Rich's decision to use Beck instead of Bruno at a session that led to the latter's leaving Rich's band. But any animosity that might have existed is long forgotten, and these two make exquisite music together. The set consists of standards such as "Lazy Afternoon," "Eleanor Rigby," "Tenderly" (featuring Beck on solo guitar), "Cherokee" and the like, along with one original by each of the guitarists. At first, you might think that you would miss the rhythm section, but from the first notes, that is not an issue. For those who want to hear the tradition of electric jazz guitar, as well as its future, this is the place to go. ~ Ross Boissoneau