(2003) Murphy's Law

Murphy Lee

... read moreIt's almost impossible to not like the affable Murphy Lee (aka da Skool Boy), but the same can't be said about his debut solo album, titled -- surprisingly enough -- Murphy's Law. Though you can't exactly say he's fired a blank, the number of unengaging productions and unimaginative rhymes makes it...

01:09′:21″ 19 Songs

1
Murphy Lee
Be Myself (Intro)
0:36
2
Murphy Lee
Don't Blow It (Album Version (Explicit))
4:18
3
Murphy Lee
Hold Up (Album Version (Explicit))
4:21
4
Murphy Lee
Granpa Gametight (Album Version (Explicit))
3:58
5
Murphy Lee
Luv Me Baby (Album Version (Explicit))
4:28
6
Murphy Lee
Murphy's Law
2:20
7
Murphy Lee
Cool Wit It (Album Version (Explicit))
5:05
8
Murphy Lee
This Goes Out (Album Version (Explicit))
4:54
9
Murphy Lee
Wat Da Hook Gon Be (Dirty)
3:46
10
Murphy Lee
So X-Treme (Album Version (Explicit))
4:52
11
Murphy Lee
How Many Kids You Got
0:33
12
Murphy Lee
I Better Go (Album Version (Explicit))
4:14
13
Murphy Lee
Red Hot Riplets (Album Version (Explicit))
4:46
14
Murphy Lee
Regular Guy (Album Version (Explicit))
3:41
15
Murphy Lee
Gods Don't Chill (Album Version (Explicit))
3:45
16
Murphy Lee
Murphy Lee (Album Version (Explicit))
4:29
17
Murphy Lee
Head From A Midget
0:16
18
Murphy Lee
Shake Ya Tailfeather (Radio)
4:57
19
Murphy Lee
Same Ol' Dirty (Album Version (Explicit))
4:02
Released 01 January 2003, ℗ 2003 Universal Motown Records, a division of UMG Recordings, Inc.

Review

It's almost impossible to not like the affable Murphy Lee (aka da Skool Boy), but the same can't be said about his debut solo album, titled -- surprisingly enough -- Murphy's Law. Though you can't exactly say he's fired a blank, the number of unengaging productions and unimaginative rhymes makes it apparent that Lee is best suited to the guest spots and supporting roles that helped pave the way for this. This fact is proved most in the songs where Lee is the one getting the assistance; for instance, one "what!/yeah!/OK!" combination from Lil Jon (in "This Goes Out") all but destroys the rest of the record. In lead single "What da Hook Gon Be," Lee boasts that he's skilled enough to not need a hook, and then he proves throughout the song (and the remainder of the album) that yes, he does in fact need a hook. Adding profit potential is the reappearance of "Shake Ya Tailfeather," the collaboration with P. Diddy and Nelly that managed to mysteriously trump Jay-Z's "La La La" as the biggest song from the Bad Boys II soundtrack. The album's low point is "Murphy Lee," which takes its main vocal hook from -- ta dum, ta dum -- Marvin Gaye's "Mercy Mercy Me." You can guess how the words are changed. ~ Andy Kellman