(1996) The Gold Collection

Sheena Easton

... read moreThe Gold Collection is a 16-track compilation of Sheena Easton's non-hits, taking songs from the majority of her albums that were either never released or failed to gain any commercial fame. Three of her Top 40 hits do manage to surface ("Morning Train," "Modern Girl," and "For Your Eyes Only"), and...

49′:20″ 16 Songs

1
Morning Train (Nine To Five) [Edit] (Edit)
Sheena Easton
3:17
2
Moody (My Love)
Sheena Easton
2:05
3
Modern Girl
Sheena Easton
3:26
4
Paradox
Sheena Easton
2:40
5
For Your Eyes Only
Sheena Easton
3:04
6
One Man Woman
Sheena Easton
3:05
7
Summer's Over
Sheena Easton
3:22
8
Take My Time
Sheena Easton
2:36
9
Calm Before The Storm
Sheena Easton
3:26
10
Just Another Broken Heart
Sheena Easton
3:23
11
Savoir Faire
Sheena Easton
3:10
12
Are You Man Enough
Sheena Easton
3:22
13
Back In The City
Sheena Easton
3:43
14
Letters From The Road
Sheena Easton
3:21
15
I Don't Need Your Word
Sheena Easton
3:17
16
So We Say Goodbye
Sheena Easton
2:03
Released 18 March 1996, 1996 RT Industries

Review

The Gold Collection is a 16-track compilation of Sheena Easton's non-hits, taking songs from the majority of her albums that were either never released or failed to gain any commercial fame. Three of her Top 40 hits do manage to surface ("Morning Train," "Modern Girl," and "For Your Eyes Only"), and even though the collection is sparse on familiarity, it does contain a fair amount of attractive material. A handful of songs, including "Summer's Over," "Back in the City," "So We Say Goodbye," "Calm Before the Storm," and "Paradox" present Easton's softer side for the most part, bringing to light what a fine vocalist she is outside of her radio pop. Die-hard Easton fans will want to own The Gold Collection mainly as a convenient assortment of second-bests, but for the curious and the hit lovers, it should be regarded as a later buy. This set may also spark some interest in Easton's back catalog, especially albums such as 1985's Do You and 1987's No Sound but a Heart, where she began to sing softer, more adult-oriented love songs and ballads. ~ Mike DeGagne