(1998) Songs The Lord Taught Us

The Cramps

... read moreContinuing the spooked-out and raging snarls of their Gravest Hits EP, the Cramps once again worked with Alex Chilton on the group's full-album debut, Songs the Lord Taught Us. The jacket reads "file under: sacred music," but only if one's definition includes the holy love of rockabilly sex-stomp...

54′:28″ 18 Songs

1
Tv Set (Remastered)
The Cramps
3:13
2
Rock On The Moon (Remastered)
The Cramps
1:47
3
Garbageman
The Cramps
3:34
4
I Was A Teenage Werewolf (Remastered)
The Cramps
3:03
5
Sunglasses After Dark
The Cramps
3:47
6
The Mad Daddy (1989 Digital Remaster)
The Cramps
3:47
7
Mystery Plane (1989 Digital Remaster)
The Cramps
2:42
8
Zombie Dance (Remastered)
The Cramps
1:55
9
What's Behind The Mask (Remastered)
The Cramps
2:05
10
Strychnine
The Cramps
2:25
11
I'm Cramped (Rermastered)
The Cramps
2:36
12
Tear It Up (Remastered)
The Cramps
2:32
13
Fever
The Cramps
4:16
14
I Was A Teenage Werewolf (1989 Digital Remaster)
The Cramps
4:48
15
Mystery Plane (Original Mix)
The Cramps
3:34
16
Twist And Shout (1989 Digital Remaster)
The Cramps
2:31
17
I'm Cramped (1989 Digital Remaster)
The Cramps
2:37
18
The Mad Daddy (Original Mix/Remastered)
The Cramps
3:16
Released 01 January 1998, This Compilation ℗ 1998 Capitol Records Inc.

Review

Continuing the spooked-out and raging snarls of their Gravest Hits EP, the Cramps once again worked with Alex Chilton on the group's full-album debut, Songs the Lord Taught Us. The jacket reads "file under: sacred music," but only if one's definition includes the holy love of rockabilly sex-stomp, something which the Cramps fulfill in spades. Having spent Gravest Hits mostly doing revamps of older material, the foursome tackled a slew of originals like "The Mad Daddy" and "TV Set" this time around, creating one of the few neo-rockabilly records worthy of the name. Years later Songs still drips with threat and desire both, testament to both the band's worth and Chilton's just-right production. "Garbageman" surfaced as a single in some areas, a wise choice given the at-once catchy roll of the song and downright frightening guitar snarls, especially on the solo. The covers of the Sonics' "Strychnine" and Billy Burnette's "Tear It Up" -- not to mention the concluding riff on "Fever" -- all challenge the originals. Interior has the wailing, hiccuping, and more down pat, but transformed into his own breathless howl, while Ivy and Gregory keep up the electric fuzz through more layers of echo than legality should allow. Knox helms the drums relentlessly; instead of punching through arena rock style, Chilton keeps the rushed rhythm running along in the back, increasing the sheer psychosis of it all. ~ Ned Raggett